How Photography is raising Climate Change Awareness

#EverydayClimateChange

September 28, 2020
Last Polar Bear Coldimages Getty Images

Last Polar Bear Coldimages Getty Images

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Is 'Climate Change' real?

Photographer James Whitlow Delano has spent a majority of his life travelling the world snapping photos that show the answer. His travels take him around the world, talking to climatologists and marine biologists and learning about many cultures. Delano was inspired many other talented photographers to create an Instagam feed that showcases work from photographers in six continents. Showing the proof is in the photo taken in realtime with the ability to spread to the masses using social media. It's #1Thing and a way to raise awareness about Climate Change in a way that can easily be understood. All you have to do is look... 

Drowning in Plastic 9/1/20 - James Whitlow Delano

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This week, “Drowning in Plastic” opened at Visa Pour L’Image in Perpignan, France. Photos by James Whitlow Delano @jameswhitlowdelano 1st: Man sorts recyclable plastics at a recycling business in Happyland district in the Tondo slum. Manila, Philippines Tondo and other Metro Manila slums are overrun with plastic and other recyclable materials, creating jobs for local residents in the recycling business. Not only is plastic creating massive problems to the marine ecosystem where zooplankton, the foundation of the marine ecosystem, mistake micro plastic for food – weakening them by filling their stomachs with toxics not food - but this could lead to a collapse of marine ecosystems upon which all sea life, including humans, depend. The primary component in plastic is petroleum. Perversely, petroleum fuels are also used to in the production of plastic, releasing greenhouse gases and warming the atmosphere. There needs to be a paradigm shift need for humanity to deal with the manifold environmental problems related to this most-versatile of materials. 2nd: Plastic accumulates in the Tullahan River delta shortly before it empties into Manila Bay and eventually the South China Sea. Six of the top 10 contributors to ocean plastic are the nations surrounding the South China Sea - the Philippines is the world’s third largest contributor to ocean plastic behind China and Indonesia. 3rd: Outrigger fishing boats amidst a great congregation of floating plastic, styrofoam and the remains of water hyacinth, an exotic species of floating plant that has spread like wildfire in Southeast Asia at the Navotas Fish Port Complex. Metro Manila, Philippines As dramatic as floating plastic is, Erik van Sebille, at Utrecht University in the Netherlands found in 2015 that 95% - 99% of all plastic in the ocean is not on the surface anymore. Venue: Visa Pour L'Image Couvent des Minimes Perpignan, France 29 Auguest – 27 September 2020 10am – 8pm More Info: https://www.visapourlimage.com/en/festival/exhibitions/une-planete-noyee-dans-le-plastique #VisaPourL’Image #plastic #photoexhibition #photofestival #perpignan #reportage #jameswhitlowdelano #environment #microplastic

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The Nelson Island Ice Dome 8/5/20 - James Whitlow Delano

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Photo by James Whitlow Delano @jameswhitlowdelano on @everydayclimatechange: The Nelson Island Ice Dome looms across Fildes Bay from the Bellingshausen Ice Dome. Antarctica 98% of Antarctica is covered with ice. The continent occupies 10% of the earth's surface but contains 91% of the world's ice and 70% of its fresh water. Antarctic's ice sheets are on average 2000m (6562 ft) thick with a maximum thickness of 4,500m (14764 ft) because the Antarctic continent is actually an archipelago, with much of it below sea level with the massive bulk and weight of the ice sheets preventing seawater from entering. If all the ice were to melt, sea levels would rise 55m (180ft). Temperatures along the Antarctic Peninsula have warmed 3C (5.4 F) since 1951. 87% of its glaciers on the east coast have receded with high publicized shattering of Larsen A & B floating ice shelves. There was a record high temperature of 20.75C (69.35 F) recorded last summer on an island off the peninsula. According to Copernicus Climate Change Service, temperatures every month of 2020 have been above average. Special thanks to @inach_gob (Instituto Antarctico Chileno) & @marcachile for making this project possible. Thanks to @kdickerman, @washpostphoto photo editor #antarctica #INACH #marcachile #washingtonpost #climatechange #climatecrisis #ice #meltingice #warmingseas

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Cliffs crowd King George Island's Drake Passage coast with the glaciers of Nelson Island's ice dome. Covid-19 is causing problems even in Antarctica published in Washington Post @washingtonpost. 7/10/20 - James Whitlow Delano 

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I’m James Whitlow Delano @jameswhitlowdelano, founder of @everydayclimatechange. This week I will share the series “Covid-19 is causing problems even in Antarctica, as this photographer found out”, published in Washington Post @washingtonpost. 1st: Cliffs crowd King George Island's Drake Passage coast, renown for its horrific weather that can change in the blink of an eye, with the glaciers of Nelson Island's ice dome closing in the horizon on one of the first days of autumn. Antarctica Despite 98% of Antarctica's coast being covered in ice, it is the driest continent - a desert. 2nd: As lush as it gets in Antarctica. Mosses, lichens and cyanobacteria thrive in a little wetland on the Drake Passage coastline on King George Island. during the brief Antarctic summer. Most life in Antarctica is in the sea, or dependent on the sea. The only terrestrial plant life in Antarctica are lichens, mosses and two species angiosperms (flowering, seed-producing plants). Cyanobacteria, Casanova-Katny explains, fix atmospheric nitrogen into the inorganic soil, fertilizing it and making it possible first for lichen to take hold on the continent and then mosses. Without nitrogen in the soil, no plants would be able to grow in Antarctica. Ocean currents and winds circling the continent isolate in a way unknown in the comparatively verdant Arctic. So the colonization of Antarctica by plant life is incredibly slow and limited to a foothold on the 2% of the continent which is ice-free. Special thanks to @inach_gob (Instituto Antarctico Chileno) & @marcachile for making this project possible. Thanks to @kdickerman, @washpostphoto photo editor #antarctica #INACH #washingtonpost #washingtonpostphoto #climatechange #climatecrisis #science #glaciology #inach_gob #marcachíle

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Fires burn through the Phnom Tnout Wildlife Sanctuary, in northern Cambodia. 7/31/20 - Sean Gallagher

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Image by Sean Gallagher @sean_gallagher_photo Fires burn through the Phnom Tnout Wildlife Sanctuary, in northern Cambodia. Fires in the area are lit by farmers, loggers and local people looking to either capture wildlife or clear land for agriculture. ~~~ In 2018, fires burnt in record numbers throughout the forests of north and central Cambodia. At their peak during the dry season between January and March, it is estimated up to 1,800 fires were burning in the country, more than in any other country throughout South East Asia at that time. ~~~ I spent 3 weeks in Cambodia in February documenting the challenges the country's forests are facing. This project was made possible with support from the @pulitzercenter ~~~ #asia #southeastasia #cambodia #siemreap #phnompenh #deforestation #forests #angkor #climatechange #climatecrisis #COP26 #cambodiaburning #fire #everydayclimatechange #everydayextinction #djimavicpro2 #dji

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Shore erosion on Pelly Island, Northwest Territories, Canada. 7 /20/20 - Weronika Murray 


What's standing on the frontline against climate change? Forests! 6/22/20 - Caroline Bennett

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Photo by Caroline Bennett|@carobennett for @everydayclimatechange “What we are doing to the forests of the world is but a reflection of what we are doing to ourselves and to one another.” -C. Maser What's standing on the frontline against climate change? Forests! Forests are the largest storehouse of carbon after oceans, but when forests are destroyed, they release massive quantities of carbon dioxide, methane and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Reducing deforestation and forest degradation is integral to the solution to the climate change crisis. I’ve been “quiet” in pictures lately but what better time to emerge than #WorldRainforestDay. In honor of life-giving forests, here’s a little beauty and hope from one of the world’s largest and most important, the Amazon. At roughly the size of a full face of the moon, the Amazon Rainforest is so vast and biodiverse that scientists are still discovering plant and animal species. The Amazon basin plays a critical role locally and globally in regulating weather patterns, its “flying rivers”—humid air currents that deliver water to the vast rainforest in the process of evapotranspiration—may be ebbing, which has dire consequences for the region's ability to help curb global warming. Rising temperatures in the Amazon, in large part due to climate change, are creating arid savannas that disrupt the water cycle. On top of this, as rainforests fall to deforestation, there are fewer trees to release the water vapor that creates these flying rivers. Not only does the Amazon serve as the “lungs of the world” in its great ability to capture greenhouse gases such as CO2, the Amazon Basin is also a huge water pump. Experts say that flying rivers may transport as much water as the Amazon River itself—a huge rain machine that must be preserved. Here are just a few organizations I can vouch for doing great work: @amazonfrontlines, @amazonwatch, @amazonconservationteam, @amazonaid @rainforestactionnetwork #climatechange #globalwarming #EarthsLastWilds #indigenousvoices #climate #amazon #ecuador #brazil #everydayecuador #WorldRainforestDay

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